WOW! JAPAN

Japanese food/Japanese cuisine
Japanese Dishes - Japan Culture

Japanese food is not only beautiful in appearance but also it has been registered as UNESCO's Intangible Cultural Heritage due to its healthy use of seasonal ingredients. Here we will inform you about Japanese cuisine and home-style cooking. If you come to Japan, you can learn how to make home cooked dishes! You can find more information about the cooking-experience tours below.

What is Japanese food?

Japanese food (Nihon Ryori or Nippon Ryori) is a cuisine that was created in Japanese society. Therefore, we also sometimes call Japanese food to distinguish between Western food. Japanese food was registered as an intangible cultural heritage in 2013, utilizing the original taste of ingredients and cherishing the senses of the different seasons.

In a broader sense, it consists of meals that are made everyday in Japan, but in the narrow sense, it includes a range of devotional dishes and kaiseki dishes such as what is provided during the Japan New Year, equinoctial week, cherry blossom season in spring, to traditional rice dumplings covered with bean jam.

Favorite Japanese food

Sushi

Sushi is a Japanese cuisine that combines rice and seafood. Broadly speaking, "Sushi (Hayashizushi)" which was relatively recently appeared using "Vinegared rice" and fresh seafood such as "handful sushi", and "Fishery sushi which is fermented fish and shellfish lactic acid with rice and salt" (Teruzuji) " is divided into.
Around the 4th century BC in Southeast Asia, cooked cereals such as rice and barley were stored for a long period of time by lactic acid fermentation with the power of lactic acid bacteria. It is said that the originating roots of sushi was brought over to Japan around the Nara period (710 - 794).

Ramen

Ramen is mainly a Chinese noodle and soup dish, and in many cases it is a noodle dish that combines various ingredients such as sliced pork (chashu) and dried seaweed (menma). Another name is Chinese noodles and Chinese side soba and Nanjing soba. In 1910, “Come to the House” was founded as the first ramen specialty shop in the Asakusa district of Tokyo. Unfortunately it is no longer around now. From around 1920 to around 1920, ramen shops were opening up one after another in various parts of the country, and it is said that many of the shops were the originators of local ramen opened at this time.

Tonkatsu

"Tonkatsu" is a pork cutlet or fillet coated in panko breadcrumbs then deep-fried resulting in a delicious crispy taste. It is common for tonkatsu to be served with cabbage slices and rice. It is a standard to eat it with a kind of Worcester sauce "Tonkatsu sauce" which is characterized by a rich and fruity taste. Instead of sauce, try sprinkling radish and ponzu (seasoning using citrus fruit juice).

Tempura

Tempura is a Japanese dish that consists of fish, shellfish or vegetables that have been battered and deep-fried. It has been said that it was brought to Japan by Christian missionaries around 1573-1603, originally being deep-fried foods spread from Nagasaki part of Japan. In the earlier times, Japanese deep-fried food was simply fried without breading or batter, or fried with rice flour. The style that incorporates batter such as flour, is fried in Kyoto in the 17th century after being brought from the West in the 16th century and then later spread as a food stall item in the 18th century of the Edo period. Not only seafood but also ingredients of vegetables are popular now.

Soba

Buckwheat is a Japanese noodle that is processed using buckwheat flour made from grain buckwheat raw material. Today, "buckwheat" in Japanese means "no soba" in the form of noodles. Long ago cooked foods such as rice porridge, since the technology of milling has been transmitted, "Sobagaki (heated with buckwheat flour)" or "Soba dumpling it was changed to such as "I baked it." In the middle of the Edo period (1603 - 1867), "buckwheat" which kneaded buckwheat flour with water was stretched and cut into noodles. Soba can be eaten either by dipping the cold noodles in a special sauce mixed with condiments such as green onion and wasabi, or simply eaten as a warm noodle soup dish. Tempura, wild vegetables and other ingredients are often combined to enhance the flavor of the dish.

Udon

Udon is a noodle made of flour that is kneaded to a certain type of width and thickness and cut long. Thin udon noodles are commonly referred to as "cold" or "noodle", but there is no strict regulation except that there is only a regulation by dry thickness for dry noodles and even thin noodles like "Inani Udon" is another example that also exists. Also, if thin noodles also meet the criteria, there is a provision that it may be called "Kishimen, Tonakaka" for dry noodles in which these are also included in one type of udon.

Experience Japanese Culture [Japanese food]

Shop Tsukiji like a Pro and Cook Up Delicious Seafood

  • Private tour of Tsukiji Market
  • Learn how to choose the best ingredients for sushi and other dishes
  • Make a complete Japanese meal, including homemade dashi stock!

Visiting A House Full Of Fun and Good Food

  • Visit an olden-style Japanese house.
  • Learn how to make sushi rolls.
  • Conveniently located near the Kansai International Airport.

Handmade Soba Noodles and Chopsticks Workshop Near Tokyo

  • Lean how to make delicious soba, buckwheat noodles from scratch.
  • This husband-and-wife team are one of our best rated hosts for their warmth and inviting charm.
  • Keep your own hand-carved chopsticks as souvenirs.

Read About Japan [Japanese food] ー sort by newest to oldest ー

Sushi

Ramen

Tonkatsu

Tempura

Soba

Udon

*Please note that the information in this article is from the time of writing or publication and may differ from the latest information.