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Five Tsukemen Restaurants in Osaka Worth Waiting For

The noodles and soup of tsukemen are served separately and eaten by dipping the noodles in the steaming hot soup. With ramen, you savor the balance between the noodles and soup, but with tsukemen, you enjoy their flavors separately. Here are some popular tsukemen restaurants in Osaka.

1. Niboshi Ramen Tamagoro Tenma Main Branch

Niboshi are processed small fish and a key ingredient in Japanese dashi broth. Its flavors are irresistible for people who like fish stock. For the tsukemen (750 JPY - 900 JPY, incl. tax), you can choose either cold noodles, which are noodles that have been cooked then put in cold water, or freshly cooked noodles. During the cold months, you'll probably want to enjoy both the noodles and soup warm. We also recommend experiencing a different flavor by adding yuzu citrus & mitsuba (Japanese parsley) (100 JPY, incl. tax) as a topping.

1. Niboshi Ramen Tamagoro Tenma Main Branch

Tanii Tatemono Building, 5-6-33 Tenjinbashi, Kita-ku, Osaka-shi, Osaka

2. Tsukemen Misawa Main Shop

This restaurant specializes in tsukemen. The broth is a tonkotsu (pork bones) and fish broth. If you eat the tsukemen (750 JPY, incl. tax) the way the restaurant recommends, you will experience four different flavors. First, enjoy how it tastes on its own without adding anything; next, add the appropriate amount of finely chopped onions to enjoy a boost in umami. When you've eaten a third, add the sudachi citrus, and when you have a third left, add the black shichimi spices. When you've finished eating the noodles, you can add broth to the remaining soup, and use a hot rock to make it piping hot.

2. Tsukemen Misawa Main Shop

1F Fuku Building, 5-6-11 Fukushima, Fukushima-ku, Osaka-shi, Osaka

3. Menya Teru Osaka Main Branch

A restaurant that is dedicated not only to taste, but also to healthy, safe ingredients. There are no chemical seasonings in the soup. The flavors and texture of wheat clearly come through in the homemade noodles, which are made fresh every day. There are three noodles servings (small (1 ball), medium (1.5 balls), or large (2 balls)) to choose from, but the price is the same. The recommendation is the ajitama tsukemen (880 JPY, incl. tax), which is topped with a soft-boiled egg that has been marinated in the sauce from the restaurant's homemade char siu pork.

*Photo is from the Nakatsu branch

3. Menya Teru Osaka Main Branch

1F Sun Heights Osakaya, Sugahara, 4-1-32 Higashiyodogawa-ku, Osaka-shi, Osaka

4. Tsukemen TETSU Hankyu Sanbangai Branch

A popular Tokyo restaurant specializing in tsukemen dipping noodles. Their specialty is, of course, the tsukemen (800 JPY, incl. tax). The soup is a rich meat and fish stock made from a mixture of pork and chicken bones and niboshi fish and bonito flakes. The noodles are made with a blend of udon noodle flour and bread flour, and have the fragrance of wheat and a chewy texture. One service that represents the restaurant's dedication to quality is the hot rocks that can be put in lukewarm soup to reheat it, so the customer can always enjoy piping hot soup.

4. Tsukemen TETSU Hankyu Sanbangai Branch

B2F Hankyu Sanbangai, 1-1-3 Shibata, Kita-ku, Osaka-shi, Osaka

5. Tsukemen Suzume Main Branch

This is a tsukemen specialty restaurant in the fashionable Amerikamura in Osaka. They offer rich flavors made with tonkotsu and seafood. If you want to savor the rich soup, you should try the Amemura King (830 JPY, incl. tax), which has a thick, viscous soup. You'll be surprised by the super thick and firm noodles and soup that is so viscous that the noodles don't sink. The salt tsukemen (830 JPY, incl. tax) has a light soup and fewer calories, and is the most popular item with female customers! Take your time to really chew the noodles and enjoy the flavors of wheat!

*Image is for illustration purposes

5. Tsukemen Suzume Main Branch

2-11-11 Nishishinsaibashi, Chuo-ku, Osaka-shi, Osaka

Tsukemen tends to come with thick soup which is not meant to be consumed as is, unlike ramen. But it would be a waste to leave the soup. If you want to drink it, ask for a "soup wari" when you're finished with the noodles. They will add dashi to lighten the soup to the right consistency to drink.
*There are some restaurants that do not offer "soup wari".

*Please note that the information in this article is from the time of writing or publication and may differ from the latest information.

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